Monday Motivation: 

  How To Think More Positively & Reach Your Goals At Work!

1. Arrive at Work in a Good Mood

It’s a known fact that people  who started the day in a good mood delivered superior results and felt more positive after their calls. Their colleagues who arrived in a bad mood , on the other hand, suffered a dip in productivity of up to 10%.

A positive mood lifts your brain’s dopamine levels, resulting in improved cognitive performance. So, build a mood-lifter into your commute, whether it’s listening to music, calling a friend for a chat, watching an uplifting TED talk, or catching a highlight from your favorite late night show, and enjoy the resulting boost in brainpower as you arrive at your desk. 

2. Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time

Energy management has been discovered to be a common element of success. It’s so important to know what exactly drains and sustains you.
Keep a log of your energetic peaks and valleys for at least a week, and from those insights, build a new routine. By paying close attention, you may learn to avoid the carb-heavy lunches that make you sleepy by 2 PM or to connect with a chatty team member early in the day , when you still have the energy to wrangle his or her whimsy. 

3. Expand Your Capacity Like Athletes
Once you know your energy sources, you can expand your capacity like elite athletes! I recommend approaching a typical workday like an interval training workout by arranging tasks into bursts of intense activity interspersed with breaks or lower-intensity activities.

What interval works best? Like elite athletes and musicians—maximize your performance with 90-minute bursts of activity. So, start there: Work, for example, on that PowerPoint presentation for a frenzied 90 minutes, then shake things up with a stretch break or walking to a meeting .

4. Be an Energizer
And once you have all that energy, don’t be stingy with it. Sharing it with others will motivate your team and boost your performance, too.  People who energize others are much higher performers, and they’re more likely to be heard and to have their ideas acted upon.

Just remember, being an energizer is a more subtle skill than being a cheerleading extrovert. Cross and Parker note that “energizers are not entertainers, or even necessarily very charismatic or intense. Rather, they bring themselves fully into an interaction.”
How exactly do you do that? 

Communications analytics company Quantified Impressions reported that simply making eye contact establishes an emotional connection with the person you’re speaking with. Want someone to know he or she has your undivided attention ? Put away your cell phone, lean toward him or her, and make eye contact. 

5. Understand Your Goal Orientation
There are two types of goal orientation. People with mastery orientation are motivated by the challenge of learning something new, while people with performance orientation do better when striving for excellence by using their existing skills.

For example, a mastery-oriented individual who is tasked with improving her help desk metrics might motivate herself with a goal to re-engineer the process for incoming requests and achieve that goal by delving into the latest research and speaking to experts in other organizations. Someone who is performance-oriented, on the other hand, would do better with a goal of lifting metrics 15% above last quarter, working toward that by reviewing individual metrics from prior months, identifying when he performed at his peak, and then replicating those successes while striving to push the bar higher.

Which type are you? Whichever it is, tailor your goals and how you achieve them to suit the style that best motivates you. 

Once you’ve found your personal formula for self-motivation and rejuvenation, you’ll be better prepared to pay it forward and go beyond being a solo star performer who motivates only him or herself. Now you can begin lifting up others as you climb. 

Ask yourself: How will you motivate those around you?

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